Folacid - General Information:

A member of the vitamin B family that stimulates the hematopoietic system. It is present in the liver and kidney and is found in mushrooms, spinach, yeast, green leaves, and grasses (poaceae). Folic acid is used in the treatment and prevention of folate deficiencies and megaloblastic anemia. [PubChem]

Folacid - Pharmacology:

Folic acid, as it is biochemically inactive, is converted to tetrahydrofolic acid and methyltetrahydrofolate by dihydrofolate reductase. These folic acid congeners are transported across cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis where they are needed to maintain normal erythropoiesis, synthesize purine and thymidylate nucleic acids, interconvert amino acids, methylate tRNA, and generate and use formate. Using vitamin B12 as a cofactor, folic acid can normalize high homocysteine levels by remethylation of homocysteine to methionine via methionine synthetase.

Folacid for patients

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Folacid Interactions

Medications that interfere with your bodys ability to use folate may also increase the need for this vitamin. Medications can interfere with folate utilization, including: anticonvulsant medications (such as phenytoin, and primidone) metformin (sometimes prescribed to control blood sugar in type 2 diabetes) sulfasalazine (used to control inflammation associated with Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis) triamterene (a diuretic) Methotrexate There has been concern about the interaction between vitamin B12 and folic acid. Folic acid supplements can correct the anemia associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Unfortunately, folic acid will not correct changes in the nervous system that result from vitamin B12 deficiency. Permanent nerve damage could theoretically occur if vitamin B12 deficiency is not treated. Therefore, intake of supplemental folic acid should not exceed 1000 micrograms (g, sometimes mcg) per day to prevent folic acid from masking symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency. It is important for older adults to be aware of the relationship between folic acid and vitamin B12 because they are at greater risk of having a vitamin B12 deficiency. If you are 50 years of age or older, ask your physician to check your B12 status before you take a supplement that contains folic acid.

Folacid Contraindications

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Folacid more info

Indication, Mechanism Of Action, Drug Interactions, Food Interactions, etc..