Moxal

A competitive histamine H2-receptor antagonist. Its main pharmacodynamic effect is the inhibition of gastric secretion. .
[PubChem].

Moxal - Pharmacology:

Moxal binds competitively to H2-receptors located on the basolateral membrane of the parietal cell, blocking histamine affects. This competitive inhibition results in reduced basal and nocturnal gastric acid secretion and a reduction in gastric volume, acidity, and amount of gastric acid released in response to stimuli including food, caffeine, insulin, betazole, or pentagastrin.

Moxal for patients

Moxal is used to treat stomach and duodenal (upper small intestine) ulcers;
hypersecretory (increased acid secretion) conditions; heartburn and gastroesophageal
reflux disease (stomach contents bubbling into the esophagus causing pain). Notify your
physician if you are pregnant or nursing. Moxal may be taken with or without food.
Shake the oral suspension vigorously for 5-10 seconds before taking. Unused oral
suspension should be discarded after 30 days. Notify your physician if you develop black,
tarry stools or coffee-ground vomit.

Moxal Interactions

No drug interactions have been identified. Studies with famotidine in man, in animal models, and in vitro have shown no significant interference with the disposition of compounds metabolized by the hepatic microsomal enzymes, e.g., cytochrome P450 system. Compounds tested in man include warfarin, theophylline, phenytoin, diazepam, aminopyrine and antipyrine. Indocyanine green as an index of hepatic drug extraction has been tested and no significant effects have been found.

Moxal Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to any component of these products. Cross sensitivity in this class of compounds has been observed. Therefore, PEPCID should not be administered to patients with a history of hypersensitivity to other H2-receptor antagonists.

Generic name, Overdose, Half Life Moxal, Food Interactions, Chemical, etc..

Moxal see also